SOME CASES OF RHEUMATISM
Jun19

SOME CASES OF RHEUMATISM

By Dr. Mossa, Stuttgart GNAPHALIUM      A servant girl, twenty-nine years of age, had suffered much ever since her ninth year from rheumatism. This pain roved about in all the joints, sometimes in the fingers which are red and swollen, then again in the shoulders or the loins. She cannot sleep at night. The joints are stiff and sore and hard to move. The mother-tincture of Gnaphalium, ten drops a week, continued for two months,...

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ECHINACEA
Jun18

ECHINACEA

     I use Echinacea in all septic conditions with only good results. I consider it an indispensable remedy in the treatment of stomach and intestinal troubles during the summer months in both children and adults. In treating summer complaint among children I combine Aconite and Ipecac. With it (the Aconite in minimum doses), and always feel positive of getting results. The echinacea seems to eliminate the poison from the system, and...

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THE THERAPEUTIC USES OF HAMAMELIS VIRGINICA
Jun17

THE THERAPEUTIC USES OF HAMAMELIS VIRGINICA

By H.R. Coston, M.D.       Hamamelis Virginica is tonic, astringent, haemostatic, antiseptic, and a vascular sedative, having a special action on the muscular coat of the vessels. It causes coagulation of tissue albumen, thus constringing the superficial vessels.     Applied locally it is very useful in sprains, bruises, local congestion, fissure in ano, ulcers, varicose veins and the intractable ulcers which...

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TUBERCULOSIS
Jun15

TUBERCULOSIS

By G.W.Bowen, M.D.     That consumption is rapidly increasing is not to be questioned; not that alone, but what is almost its equal, cancers, are also becoming far more frequent. Our own State had 300 deaths from consumption last August, and that is a month in which consumptives are not wont to bid adien to earth.      Two years ago the State Board of Health for New Jersey reported over one thousand cases of cancer...

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CHELIDONIUM
Jun14

CHELIDONIUM

Dr.Kernler Translated by P.W.Shedd, M.D.      Chelidonium majus (Greek, chelidon, the swallow) is so named because the plant develops its folliage with the coming of the swallows and withers when they fly southward. It grows chiefly on calcareous soils, walls, rubbish heaps, etc., and hence more commonly near dwellings. The most important constituent of the plant appear to be the non-toxic alkaloid, chelidonin, with acids forming...

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